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Faculty

Photo of Gary Saul Morson, Professor

GARY SAUL MORSON
Professor
Crowe Hall 4-113
(847) 491-3651
g-morson@northwestern.edu

 

Research interests:


Prof. Morson's work ranges over a variety of areas: literary theory (especially narrative); the history of ideas, both Russian and European; a variety of literary genres (especially satire, utopia, and the novel); and his favorite writers -- Chekhov, Gogol, and, above all, Dostoevsky and Tolstoy. He is especially interested in the relation of literature to philosophy.

Work currently in progress:

Professor Morson typically works on a number of projects at once.  He recently completed a study of Tolstoy’s novel Anna Karenina (“Anna Karenina” in Our Time:  Seeing More Wisely), which Yale University Press will bring out in the fall of 2007.  He is also working on a study of aphorisms, witticisms, and other kinds of quotation; on a sequel to his book on time and contingency; and on a study of Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov.

Selected publications:

Prosaics and other provocations; Empahty, open time, and the novel

The Long and the short of it: From aphorism to novel (top 5 finalist for the Christian Gauss award of Phi Beta Kappa)

Narrative and Freedom: The Shadows of Time;

Mikhail Bakhtin: Creation of a Prosaics (co-authored with Caryl Emerson);

Hidden in Plain View: Narrative and Creative Potentials in "War and Peace";

The Boundaries of Genre: Dostoevsky's "Diary of a Writer" and the
Traditions of Literary Utopia.

Under the name Alicia Chudo:
And Quiet Flows the Vodka, or When Pushkin Comes to Shove: The Curmudgeon's Guide to Russian Literature and Culture.

Honors:


Professor Morson has won "best book of the year" awards from the American Comparative Literature Association and the American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages; he is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; and he is the only Northwestern professor to have held simultaneously two endowed chairs, one for research and one for teaching.

Courses taught in the last 3 years:


Undergraduate courses on the novels of Dostoevsky and Tolstoy.

Graduate courses devoted to single novels--Anna Karenina, The Brothers Karamazov, War and Peace, and The Idiot--and on Mikhail Bakhtin and on various topics in Russian intellectual history.

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